About James M. Arlandson

James M. Arlandson, Ph.D., is lifelong learner and teacher. He has published a book: Women, Class, and Society in Early Christianity: Models from Luke-Acts (now out of print). He is a student of theology and a commentator and translator of the New Testament (soon to be posted) and essayist and college teacher. Contact: jamesmalcolmrt@hotmail.com

Empress Matilda and Three Henrys

Great by birth, greater by marriage, greatest in her offspring, she lived from 1102 to 1167 and was the daughter of Henry I and mother of Henry II. She fought King Stephen for her son Henry. She was indomitable, as seen particularly in her two Great Escapes.

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Charles IV, the Handsome, King of France

The last and fourteenth king of the Capetian dynasty, he was nicknamed the Fair or Handsome because supposedly he was just that (le Bel in older French).  He was born in 1294 and reigned from 1322 to 1328. His first wife was accused of adultery. Would she survive?

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Philip II Augustus

Philip, the seventh Capetian, born in 1165, reigned from 1179 to 1223 and was nicknamed Augustus (why?). On a personal note, he had a strange wedding ceremony with the young princess Ingeborg of Denmark (some say it was witchcraft). But politically, he expanded his royal domain to the detriment of the English Plantagenets.

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Sanctification: Past, Present, Future

The moment you are saved, Christ becomes your sanctification. Now he works it out in you in slow, steady progress until the day you die, when sanctification will be completed.

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Angels: Their Origins, Abilities, and Nature

Renewalists (Pentecostals, Charismatics and Neo-Charismatics) believe that angels appear to people in their dreams or in person, even today. It is God’s ongoing ministry to us. But we must get our biblical doctrine straight, or we can stray.

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The Trinity: What Are Defective Ideas?

A prominent pastor said on global Christian television (paraphrased): “God the Father, God the Son, and God the Spirit. See? Three Gods! Right? All agree? Okay!” Not okay. We must learn about defective teachings, so we can steer clear of them.

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The Spirit’s Deity and Divine Attributes

Renewalists (Pentecostals, Charismatics, and Neo-Charismatics) believe that the Spirit has the divine nature and attributes of God. This post summarizes Scripture references and has a summary table of the attributes that the Father, Son, and Spirit share.

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The Spirit in the Church and Believers

Renewalists (Pentecostals, Charismatics and Neo-Charismatics) have a robust and biblical pneumatology (doctrine of the Spirit). The church is a living organism, and the Spirit is guiding it. But the church is made up of individual believers. The Spirit works in them too.

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6. Two Natures in One Person: Definition or Creed of Chalcedon

From the Council of Chalcedon (AD 451). English, Greek, and Latin are included; discusses how the definition opposes three deficient teachings about Christ (Apollinarianism, Nestorianism, and Monophysitism) and answers the objection that the fifth-century church just made it all up.

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1 Introduction to the Sword in Early Christianity and Islam

This series contrasts the ministry of Jesus and his view of the sword with the life of Muhammad and use of the sword. Then the series contrasts earliest Christian leaders and their view on the sword with the earliest Muslims leaders’s use of it. The two religions are not the same.

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2 The Mission of Jesus and the Sword

In our comparative study of the two religions of Christianity and Islam, we begin with the mission of Jesus, since he lived about 600 years before Muhammad. The next part in the series, the Mission of Muhammad, is designed to mirror this one you’re reading now.

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